Rejection.

Yes, this is yet another writer writing about rejection. Boo hoo and all that. I don’t ask you to read this; you may if you wish but you can also choose not to.

As writers, we so often talk of rejection as our slighly masochistic bread and butter – it makes us better, stronger, blah, blah, blah. We expect it. And if I had been wise enough to expect the rejection that faced me today then perhaps I would not be feeling so angry about it now. Angry at myself, angry at my expectations, angry at the flood of pitying looks or remarks that my positive-bordering-on-flippant attitude, with which I’ve face this dilema when asked about it, is so ‘brave’ and ‘admirable’. When did getting on with the job and not dwelling on what cannot be changed become brave and admirable? Surely that is just what must be done.

I’ve never liked to dwell on the negatives though I’ll be the first to admit that this post is somewhat self-indulgent. So what? But back to rejection: it hurts. Sometimes a lot. Right now, it feels a bit like grief, like the glimmer of hope I’ve been carrying around with me for the last few months has died, brutally. So let this be the end of it; I pick myself up and I move on.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Rejection.

  1. lynxchild says:

    I get hurt every time my writing gets rejected. Not gonna lie, it makes me feel bad. And I think that’s pretty standard. I think the real point of all of that “keep your chin up, stay brave, etc.” stuff is just that you can’t let fear of rejection prevent you from continuing to submit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s